Vintage video games are making a come back

This photo provided by Nintendo shows a scene from the video game, Super Mario Maker. After three decades of releasing Super Mario video games, the Japanese gaming giant is inviting players to create their own levels in the bouncy plumber's homeland with the user-generated Wii U title Super Mario Maker, out Friday, Sept. 11, 2015. (Nintendo via AP) This photo provided by Nintendo shows a scene from the video game, “Super Mario Maker.” After three decades of releasing “Super Mario” video games, the Japanese gaming giant is inviting players to create their own levels in the bouncy plumber’s homeland with the user-generated Wii U title “Super Mario Maker,” out Friday, Sept. 11, 2015. (Nintendo via AP)

CHICOPEE, Mass. (WWLP) –  If you brush the dust off some of those old video games you have in your closet, they could be worth a lot of money. And bring back some memories. Vintage video games are making a comeback.

Once relegated to dusty bargain bins, some old video games are being shrink wrapped and locked. More people are becoming anxious to get their hands on a retro video game controller to mash buttons and listen to the sounds that bring them back to the simpler digital ages.

Video game consuls which you play the game on date back several generations all the way back to the 70’s. And while they are worth some money not nearly as expensive as some of the games that people are playing.

Some of the more obscure games can be $200-$300 a game. Video Game Castle in Chicopee is one of the stores that has seen the uptick in demand.

Ron Peltier, manager of Video Game Castle, told 22News, “I was taking one in it was called wild guns and we had no idea that it was that valuable and did some investigating and all of a sudden it’s a $250 game.”

The specialized market ranges from Atari, Nintendo, to N64 and on. “Like the Mariocart 64 that was a great game, yea,” says Peltier.

Call it nostalgia, a collectors items, or simple fun, these old games are gaining value in the middle-aged market as they become harder and harder to find. Michael Page of Springfield says, “It’s crazy it’s like $60 for a game when you can get one for like $20 or $30 and they are still fairly new.”

Not all retro games are worth the big jing, but you can still have a lot of fun playing them.

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